Currently viewing the tag: "anaphylaxis"

Skin prick testAs reported in the Daily Mail, a new UK study published in the medical journal Allergy finds that for every child diagnosed with a milk allergy via blood and skin prick tests, another goes undiagnosed that will suffer a reaction.

Dr Kate Grimshaw, a specialist pediatric dietitian at Southampton Children’s Hospital, reported that not all allergies can be detected by measuring levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody, which is linked to allergic reactions.

Dr Grimshaw, who participated in the EuroPrevall study funded by the European Union, said:

Dr GrimshawWe know that sometimes if a child is seen for a possible food allergic reaction – to any food, not just milk – but tests show there is no measurable IgE, then a possible food reaction may be ruled out, when in fact the child may be reacting to the food, just not via IgE. This research will hopefully highlight to GPs and non-allergy specialists that just because an IgE test is negative, the child may in fact be reacting to a food and further investigations should be carried out.

The study, which followed over 9,000 babies from nine European countries until age two, found that 1.3% of children from the UK reacted to milk within two hours, but only 45% had IgE levels associated with symptoms.

Continue reading »

Mimi-Tang-portraitABC News Australia reports that a study of hospital admissions in the country from 2005 to 2013 found a 50% jump in children admitted for anaphylaxis.

Professor Mimi Tang of the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) said the highest rates of hospital admission were for younger children, but that rates for older children aged 5-14 more than doubled.

“What we think is happening is that more children are getting food allergies but of concern, these allergies tend to be peanut, tree nut and shellfish that you don’t grow out of,” she said.

Continue reading »

It’s been seven years since Brian Hom lost his son BJ to an anaphylactic reaction in 2008 while on vacation in Mexico to celebrate BJ’s high school graduation. Since then, Brian has been a tireless advocate for the food allergy community.

In memory of BJ Hom, please take a few moments to see this video entitled “Food Allergies Don’t Take Vacations”. Even if you’ve seen it before, this cautionary tale will remind you of the stakes involved when anaphylaxis strikes:

Our thoughts are with the Hom family. May Brian’s work and BJ’s legacy save the lives of many others suffering with severe food allergies.

Continue reading »

fastA team from the University of Pennsylvania identified 233 quick-service restaurants in the Center City District of Philadelphia and conducted a study of the 187 that agreed to participate. Staff were asked to respond to a tablet-based survey that assessed their knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to food allergy.

The results were both heartening and disturbing: “Despite their high motivation to help food allergic patrons, respondents knew little about how to prevent or respond to adverse events,” as quoted in the summary on the American Public Health Association (APHA) website.

Continue reading »

Dr Ruchi GuptaIn a study of discharge data collected over 5 years from over 200 hospitals in Illinois, it was determined that emergency room visits and hospitalizations of children with severe food allergies rose an average of 30% each year between 2008 and 2012.

The study, led by Dr. Ruchi Gupta, professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and attending physician at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, focused on children that suffered anaphylaxis, a potentially fatal allergic reaction.

Previously, white children and those from higher-income families were affected most by food allergies, but the study shows that the rates of Hispanic, African American and lower-income children are skyrocketing as well.

“This study shows that severe food allergies are beginning to impact children of all races and income. This is no longer primarily a disease of children who are white and/or from middle-to-high income families. Nobody is immune to it,” said Dr Gupta.

Continue reading »

FDA BuildingOn Wednesday, three senate democrats issued a letter to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) urging the authority to issue a rule requiring manufacturers to label for the presence of sesame.

Sesame – though it is estimated that several hundred thousand Americans are allergic to the seed – is not recognized as an allergen under current FALCPA labeling rules, and so is often hidden under other ingredient names such as “tahini” or “natural flavoring”.

To quote the letter issued by Senators Chris Murphy (D-CT), Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) and Edward Markey (D-MA):

Without required uniform labeling of the presence of sesame, consumers with this serious allergy have no way of protecting themselves or their family members from its potentially life-threatening consequences. As Congress recognized when it passed FALCPA (the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004), accurate and comprehensive allergen labeling is essential.

We at SnackSafely.com wholeheartedly endorse the senators’ efforts to have sesame added to the list of eight allergens recognized by FALCPA, currently peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat, soy, fish and shellfish.  We urge the FDA to also consider adding mustard and corn to the list as these are also major allergens that concern many families coping with food allergy.

Continue reading »

Uncle Sam needs you to join the fight! Click here for full-sized flyer!On Monday, the Maine legislature voted to override a veto of bill HP0776 by Republican Governor Paul LePage. The new law, entitled “An Act To Expand Public Access to Epinephrine Autoinjectors”, allows for stock epinephrine to be made available in places of public accommodation beyond schools, such as restaurants, shopping malls, etc.

Yesterday, Ohio State Rep Dr Terry Johnson published an opinion piece in the Highland County Press stating that the voluntary school stock epinephrine legislation he sponsored has already saved the lives of two children in the same Akron area school district. Both children, one allergic to peanuts, the other to pineapple, were administered epinephrine by a trained staff member when it became apparent they were suffering anaphylactic reactions.

In the same article, Johnson announced that Rep Christina Hagan has introduced a bill in the Ohio House to expand access to stock epinephrine to additional places of public accommodation beyond schools.

Continue reading »

allerjectSanofi-aventis Canada Inc has recalled two lots of its 0.15mg/0.15mL (child sized) Allerject auto-injectors due to a manufacturing defect that may prevent the device from working properly. Note that Allerject is the Canadian equivalent of the Auvi-Q sold in the US.

The defect, which affects the needle portion of the auto-injector, may prevent epinephrine from being delivered during an emergency posing a serious health risk to a child being treated for an anaphylactic reaction.

If you purchased an Allerject 0.15mg/0.15mL auto-injector in Canada on or after June 1, check to see if the lot numbers match 2857508 or 2857505. If so, make sure to follow the instructions in this press release issued by the company earlier today.

Continue reading »

OTCDillon Mueller’s story is a horrific tragedy. The 18 year-old Wisconsinite perished in 2014 from an anaphylactic reaction caused by a bee sting despite never having been diagnosed with an allergy. We extend our deepest sympathies to his family and encourage you to read about Dillon on the website his parents, Angel and George Mueller, established to memorialize him.

Because he was never diagnosed with an allergy, Dillon was never prescribed epinephrine, so there was no auto-injector on-hand to administer the only drug that might have saved his life.

In an effort to foster much needed change, the Muellers have started a petition urging the FDA to designate epinephrine an “Over the Counter” (OTC) drug, i.e. one that is readily available without a prescription. The premise of the petition is that more people would carry epinephrine if it was available without a prescription, and more people carrying would imply a greater chance of epinephrine being available when a victim suffering anaphylaxis isn’t carrying his own.

While we appreciate the Muellers’ efforts to help prevent others from suffering the same fate as Dillon’s, we believe this effort is misguided.

Continue reading »

Take 2 Rosie

Let’s end the constant stream of headlines that bring us news of yet another preventable death!

If your child self-carries, remind them to always Take 2 epinephrine auto-injectors along everywhere, every time! Perform spot checks! Nag them! Don’t let them out of the house without them!

If your child is too young to carry, make sure their caregivers always have access to two epinephrine auto-injectors and are trained when and how to use them!

Whether your child is 4 or 24, your job as protector doesn’t end until there’s a cure!

Click here for a set of flyers like the one above and post them at home to remind everyone to be vigilant!

Continue reading »