Currently viewing the tag: "food allergies"

MCRI

The Murdoch Children’s Research Institute of Parkville, Australia today announced results of a test they conducted of a novel new twist on an existing peanut allergy therapy.

The treatment combines traditional peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) with a probiotic, lactobacillus rhamnosus. A fixed dose of the probiotic is provided daily along with daily doses of increasing quantities of peanut protein as is customary in OIT.

60 Children were enrolled in the test, with half given the treatment and the other half a placebo. Of the 28 children given the treatment, 23 (80%) were able to include peanut in their diet at the conclusion of the 18 month course of therapy.

Continue reading »

Take 2 Soldier

We’re fighting a war out there… a war against anaphylaxis. If you have a severe allergy or care for someone who does, you’re on the front lines. So put on your helmet, be vigilant, and don’t forget your only weapon against the enemy: your epinephrine auto-injector.

Take 2 along everywhere… every time.

Continue reading »

niaid

A study by researchers of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), may shed light on why women suffer more frequent and more severe instances of anaphylaxis than men.

Anaphylaxis – a life threatening allergic reaction triggered by foods, medication, and animal stings and bites – occurs when immune cells release enzymes that cause tissues to swell and blood vessels to widen. Clinical studies have shown that women experience anaphylaxis more often than men, though the mechanism for this has not been clearly understood.

NIAID researchers found that female mice experienced more severe and longer lasting anaphylactic reactions than males. They discovered that Estradiol – a type of estrogen – enhances the effect of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), an enzyme that causes a number of symptoms of anaphylaxis.

Continue reading »

Pretzel!

We are pleased to announce the addition of two new members to our Manufacturer Partnership Program whose products now appear in the Safe Snack Guide as well as Allergence:

Continue reading »

FARE Logo

After learning the results of tests performed by SnackSafely.com and the subsequent admission by ContentChecked that their app ignores “may contain” and other cross-contact warnings, Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE) has altered the Corporate Partners page on their website. The advocacy no longer displays language that could be construed as a tacit approval of ContentChecked, replacing it with a general disclaimer that “FARE does not review, test, sponsor, endorse or recommend any products or services that may appear on our website.

SnackSafely.com continues efforts to reach users of ContentChecked who may be relying on the app to determine the allergy content of foods. In tests, ContentChecked declared a series of common food products “free from peanuts” despite clearly visible “may contain peanuts” warnings on their labels. Users relying on the app put themselves and their children at risk of adverse reactions and anaphylaxis.

The company has so far ignored calls by SnackSafely.com to remove their app from the marketplace until its deficiencies are addressed, instead continuing to advertise that “you can feel confident when you are shopping with ContentChecked.”

Continue reading »

autoinjectorA study of 102 patients enrolled from adult and pediatric clinics showed that only 16% used their epinephrine auto-injectors correctly. Of the remaining 84%, more than half missed 3 or more steps for proper administration.

The most common errors included:

  • Failure to hold the unit in place for at least 10 seconds after triggering
  • Failure to place the needle end of the device on the thigh, and
  • Failure to depress the device forcefully enough to activate the injection.

Continue reading »

nj-seal

New Jersey is one of only six states that still has not passed school stock epinephrine legislation, though such legislation has passed the assembly and is pending in the senate.

With the holidays upon us, the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) has issued the following call to action:

Continue reading »

NoNoNo School

Click the image to download a full-page flyer to share with your child’s teachers, school nurse and principal!

Continue reading »

Holiday-Update-Banner

It’s that time of year again! The 2014 Holiday Edition of the Safe Snack Guide has arrived just in time for your Hanukkah, Christmas, and New Year’s Celebrations! This edition features a full page dedicated to peanut, tree nut and egg-free holiday-themed goodies to help you celebrate while accommodating those with life-threatening food allergies.

By restricting foods served at your classroom celebrations and holiday parties to products listed in the Guide, you avoid introducing these allergens which can cause contact reactions in children allergic to them. This is a great way of accommodating – not excluding – children with severe allergies to these foods. (We stress that the parents must always be the final arbiters of food given to a child with food allergies!)

Continue reading »

If you have a young child with food allergies, then you must know – or get to know – Kyle Dine. Kyle’s ability to convey a message of empowerment through song and entertainment is legendary within the food allergy and celiac communities.

Now Kyle wants to take that message to schools nationwide with a series of videos targeted at specific grade levels. But to do so, he needs your help to raise the requisite funds.

Continue reading »