Currently viewing the tag: "food allergies"

Pretzel!We’re pleased to announce the addition of new products from a long-time member of our Manufacturer Partnership Program. These products now appear in the Safe Snack Guide and Allergence, our product screening service.

F003066CC5Lucy’s is dedicated to the best practices in allergen safety. They carefully exclude wheat/gluten, milk, eggs, peanuts and tree nuts from their products and plant. And, best of all, their treats taste great! They offer a wide range of flavors and several pack sizes for lunches and travel. (Click to learn more about Lucy’s and their products.)

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Take 2 Rosie

Let’s end the constant stream of headlines that bring us news of yet another preventable death!

If your child self-carries, remind them to always Take 2 epinephrine auto-injectors along everywhere, every time! Perform spot checks! Nag them! Don’t let them out of the house without them!

If your child is too young to carry, make sure their caregivers always have access to two epinephrine auto-injectors and are trained when and how to use them!

Whether your child is 4 or 24, your job as protector doesn’t end until there’s a cure!

Click here for a set of flyers like the one above and post them at home to remind everyone to be vigilant!

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Dylan-HillIn an all-too-familiar scenario, the Mirror reports yet another teen in the UK has suffered a fatal bout of anaphylaxis while dining out.

Dylan Hill, an 18 year old apprentice builder, collapsed on a street in Barnsley, South Yorkshire an hour after consuming a curry dish while on a date. He was rushed to the hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Dylan, who had a severe tree nut allergy and had suffered reactions before, did not have his epinephrine auto-injector on-hand.

Dylan’s father, Anthony Robinson said: “EpiPens aren’t practical for an 18-year-old lad who likes to wear skinny jeans. But it is there for a reason – people are not indestructible.

“He had known for years he had the allergy – I was always telling him to carry his EpiPen and inhalers, because he had asthma as well. He would say, ‘I know, I will’, but as he got older he didn’t really take it out as much. He got a bit lax and often went out without it. He was 18 and thought it wouldn’t happen to him and he would have time to get to a hospital if it did.”

Let’s take a moment to reflect and learn from this senseless tragedy.

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American-Thoracic-SocietyIn a study to be presented at the ongoing American Thoracic Conference (ATS) 2015, it was determined that many children suffering from asthma have a sensitivity to peanuts but their families are unaware.

“Many of the respiratory symptoms of peanut allergy can mirror those of an asthma attack, and vice versa. Examples of those symptoms include shortness of breath, wheezing and coughing,” said study lead author Robert Cohn, MD, MBA. “This study aimed to evaluate the proportion of asthmatic children who also demonstrated a sensitivity to peanuts.”

The study researched the charts of 1517 children diagnosed with asthma at Mercy Children’s Hospital in Toledo, Ohio. Of the charts reviewed, 665 (43.8%) had IgE testing for peanuts, and of this group 148 (22.3%) had positive results.

Of the children with positive IgE tests, more than half (53%) of the children and their families did not suspect there was any sensitivity to peanut.

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Yes, it’s Food Allergy Awareness Week, a great time to educate others about the causes and dangers of anaphylaxis. But while awareness itself is a wonderful thing, it doesn’t mean a whole lot unless it motivates a change in behavior.

So pause for a moment and answer this one overriding question:

Did you remember to Take 2?

What we’re referring to, of course, is to always take 2 life-saving epinephrine auto-injectors along and having them on-hand wherever you go. Whether you’re relaxing at home, off to school, or just stepping outside to walk the dog, take 2 along everywhere… every time.

Why 2? Because a single dose may not be enough to halt the progression of anaphylaxis when you or your child suffers a severe allergic reaction. And you never want to be caught with too little epinephrine on-hand when a life depends on it.

So while you’re busy spreading awareness, be sure to heed the message. To help remind you and your loved ones, click here to download a collection of flyers from our Take 2 Campaign like the one below and be sure to hang them everywhere.

Because, let’s face it: awareness alone won’t stop anaphylaxis. Only epinephrine will.

Click here for printable flyers from out Take 2 campaign

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Pretzel!We’re pleased to announce the addition of a new member to our Manufacturer Partnership Program whose products now appear in the Safe Snack Guide and Allergence, our product screening service.

Eleni's New YorkEleni’s New York specializes in beautiful hand-made, hand-iced sugar cookies baked from scratch in a dedicated peanut and tree nut-free facility. No conveyor belts, no automated decorating, no mass production, all done the old fashioned way, one cookie at a time.

The company also markets a line of Crisp cookies in a variety of flavors and Color Me! cookies that come complete with edible markers. (Click to learn more about Eleni’s and their products.)

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GeorgiaCapitolBuildingThe governor of Georgia, Nathan Deal, signed a bill into law last week allowing for stock epinephrine in places of public accommodation throughout the state.

SB 126 provides the legal framework for placement of epinephrine auto-injectors in restaurants, malls, camps, and other public establishments for use when anaphylaxis – a potentially fatal allergic reaction – is suspected. The bill also provides the necessary Good Samaritan immunity for trained individuals who administer the drug in good faith.

Georgia passed legislation allowing stock epinephrine for schools two years ago. SB 126 also provides for the prescription of stock levalbuterol sulfate and albuterol sulfate (typically used in asthma “rescue inhalers”) for use in schools when a victim suffers severe respiratory distress such as wheezing, shortness of breath, or difficulty breathing.

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AllergicLiving LogoThe May edition of the Allergic Living News Report – dedicated to Food Allergy Awareness Month – features a free, must-read e-booklet entitled: “18 Things You Need to Know About Food Allergy Reactions”.

This resource as especially valuable for families coping with food allergies as well as teachers, school nurses, restauranteurs, and everyone else that deals with the public in a setting involving food. Distributed as an easy-to-download PDF that can be viewed on your ebookletPC, tablet and phone, it provides a summary of important facts, strategies, and statistics to keep in mind should you or a loved one experience (or suspect) an anaphylactic reaction. The publication is structured in an easy-to-read read conversational format and covers many topics such as “Severe reactions: are they rare or frequent?”, “Define anaphylaxis”, and “When antihistamines don’t measure up”.

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hershey-logoWe field hundreds of questions each month about our Safe Snack Guide, a resource relied upon by thousands of schools and tens of thousands of parents nationwide to keep peanuts and tree nuts out of the classroom and the home.

Most are for products from companies that have yet to join our Manufacturer Partnership, the ones denoted in the Guide by black bullets. For these, we make a best effort to verify they are not produced on shared lines where peanuts and tree nuts are also processed, and we do this generally by starting with the consumer service line.

Recently, we’ve had a number of inquiries regarding Hershey’s Kisses and 1.55oz Milk Chocolate Bars, the two Hershey’s brand items listed in the Guide. We decided it was time to revisit the safety of these products by reaching out to the Hershey Company directly and requesting an official response from the firm. Our inquiry was specific: Are these items made on shared lines with peanuts and tree nuts?

We received the following response from Jeff Beckman, Director of Corporate Communications for the Hershey Company:

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02-peanutsA study of the accidental exposure of children with physician-confirmed peanut allergy was published in the Journal of Clinical and Translational Allergy earlier this month.

The parents of 1941 children were recruited from Canadian allergy clinics and allergy advocacy organizations over a ten year period beginning in 2004, who completed questionnaires regarding the accidental exposure to peanuts of their children over the preceding year and the results were correlated.

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