A Guide to Emergency Epinephrine Options (Video, Links and Savings Programs)

Guide to Options for Emergency Epinephrine

There are a number of devices available in the US that are used to administer epinephrine in case of anaphylaxis, a serious, life-threatening allergic reaction to a food or insect venom.

These can be divided into two classes: auto-injectors — which when activated, extend a needle into the thigh and automatically administer a dose of epinephrine — and pre-filled, single-dose syringes that work similarly to traditional syringes: the device comes pre-loaded with a premeasured dose of epinephrine, the needle is uncovered and inserted in the thigh and the user presses a plunger to administer the medication.

Here follows the options approved for sale in the US.

Mylan’s EpiPen, EpiPen Jr and Mylan’s Generic Versions

These are epinephrine auto-injectors manufactured by Pfizer and marketed by Mylan in 0.30mg and 0.15mg doses. They currently hold the largest market share but are in short supply due to manufacturing problems at Pfizer’s Meridian plant. [Click here for website]

Mylan currently sponsors two savings programs: Up to $300 off their brand-name devices and $25 off their generic versions (which are identical to the brand-name versions) for those eligible.

Here’s a video showing how to use the EpiPen, EpiPen Jr, and Mylan’s Authorized Generics:

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Auvi-Q by Kaléo

This is the rectangular auto-injector manufactured and marketed by kaléo available in three dosages: 0.1mg, 0.15mg and 0.3mg. When activated, a voice prompt steps you through the administration process. [Click here for website]

Kaléo currently sponsors a savings program that provides $0 copay for those with eligible insurance and may provide the devices free of charge for those without commercial or government sponsored insurance that meet eligibility requirements.

Here’s a video showing how to use Auvi-Q:

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Impax/Amneal/Legend Adrenaclick Generic

This is the generic version of the Adrenaclick auto-injector for sale at CVS pharmacies et al, but known under different names because of acquisitions. Though this is a generic, it does not work the same way as Epipen, hence it cannot generally be dispensed in place of EpiPen or Mylan’s Authorized Generic and must be filled using a separate prescription. This device is also manufactured by Pfizer and has been prone to recent shortages.
[Click here for website]

Amneal currently sponsors a savings program providing $10 off each carton for those eligible.

Teva’s Generic Versions of EpiPen and EpiPen Jr

This device is marketed by Teva and was approved by the FDA in August 2018. It functions similarly to the Mylan’s EpiPen and as such is the first FDA approved generic for EpiPen. [Click here for website]

Teva currently sponsors a savings program providing up to $30 off each carton for those eligible.

Here’s a video showing how to use the Teva Generic versions of EpiPen:

Symjepi by Sandoz

This device is a prefilled syringe requiring a needle to be inserted and the plunger pressed to administer the epinephrine. The device was approved by the FDA last year and is available in 0.15mg and 0.3mg dosages. [Click here for website]

Sandoz currently sponsors a savings program that provides for up to a $0 copay for those with eligible insurance and $100 off for those without insurance.

Here’s a video showing how to use the Symjepi prefilled syringe:

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Note of disclosure: Kaléo is an advertiser with SnackSafely.com

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