Currently viewing the tag: "major food allergens"

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It’s spring time and that means it’s time for the Easter Edition of the Safe Snack Guide!

We’ve added a full page of Easter-themed goodies free of peanuts, tree nuts, and (in many cases) eggs. Some can be purchased at the corner market, others can be ordered on-line.

Once again, apologies to our readers who celebrate Passover. We are still searching for safe products that are nut-free and certified kosher for the holiday. If you know of any such products, please let us know.

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Pretzel!Please note that we have removed two products from the Safe Snack Guide due to a disclosure from the manufacturer.

After a discussion with Lisa Guzzo, Consumer Relations Manager of Just Born Quality Confections, we have decided to delist MIKE AND IKE® and HOT TAMALES® from the Guide.

While these iconic products are manufactured in a facility that does not process peanuts or tree nuts, a small portion of their products are packaged by third-parties that may use equipment that is also used for products containing these allergens. Although the firm’s labeling policy includes voluntarily labeling for potential cross contamination of the “Top 8″ allergens, we have decided to remove their products from the Guide in keeping with our policies. Consumers should address questions or concerns regarding Just Born brands by calling them toll free at 1-888-645-3453 or visiting them online at www.justborn.com.

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The label… although it provides important nutritional data, it’s wholly unreliable as a source of potential allergen information due to lax, ineffectual FALCPA labeling guidelines.

Complete disclosure of the potential for allergen cross-contact is a necessity for the millions of Americans suffering with food allergies and celiac disease. But in light of FALCPA’s shortcomings, assembling that kind of information means ignoring the label, rolling up our sleeves, and working directly with responsible manufacturers who are as concerned for the food allergy community as we are.

That’s why we established the SnackSafely.com Manufacturer PartnershipWe’ve assembled more than 40 manufacturers that provide us with detailed information regarding the processing of 11 allergens and 4 industry recognized certifications, and we provide that information to you in turn via Allergence, a free service.

Here’s an example listing of a peanut butter alternative from Don’t Go Nuts, one of our featured partners:

Allergence-Sample

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mondelez-enjoylife

In a blockbuster press release, Mondelēz – the former Kraft Foods spinoff and manufacturer of such iconic brands as Oreo, Chips Ahoy, Ritz, Cadbury and Trident – announced yesterday that it had acquired Enjoy Life Foods, the leading brand in the Free From category and a member of the SnackSafely.com Manufacturer Partnership.

“As we focus on continuing to drive growth in snacking, the acquisition of Enjoy Life Foods is a great strategic fit for us,” said Mark Clouse, Chief Growth Officer at Mondelēz International. “The Enjoy Life brand expands our portfolio into faster growing, on-trend, ‘better- for-you’ areas and provides an excellent platform to make these delicious offerings available to consumers with ‘free-from’ needs or simply looking for healthy-lifestyle options, both in the United States and beyond.”

All well and good for Mondelēz, but acquisitions of this magnitude have the potential to change a brand for good or bad, and Enjoy Life is especially important to the allergic community. To sort out the implications behind the acquisition, we contacted Joel Warady, Chief Sales and Marketing Officer for Enjoy Life.

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smartiesWe’re happy to announce that we’ve added a conversation heart product to the Valentine’s Day 2015 Edition of the Safe Snack Guide.

Smarties Love Hearts are marketed free of peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, milk, wheat, and soy by their manufacturer, providing a readily available option to families coping with these food allergies. [NOTE: We earlier made the assertion that these were corn-free which was NOT correct. Our sincere apologies.]

Special thanks to our readers Sarah Albert and Elizabeth Arras for taking the time to suggest this product!

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Cupid Pretzel

The Valentine’s Day 2015 Edition of the Safe Snack Guide has arrived with an entire section devoted to goodies for that special someone with a peanut, tree nut or egg allergy. It’s also a great resource if you are planning a classroom celebration where children with food allergies will be present.  (As always, we stress that the parents should always be the final arbiters of any food given to a child with food allergies!)

UPDATE: Thanks to our readers Sarah Albert and Elizabeth Arras, we’ve added Smarties Love Hearts – a conversation heart product marketed as safe for peanut, tree nut and egg allergies – to this edition of the Safe Snack Guide.

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MCRI

The Murdoch Children’s Research Institute of Parkville, Australia today announced results of a test they conducted of a novel new twist on an existing peanut allergy therapy.

The treatment combines traditional peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) with a probiotic, lactobacillus rhamnosus. A fixed dose of the probiotic is provided daily along with daily doses of increasing quantities of peanut protein as is customary in OIT.

60 Children were enrolled in the test, with half given the treatment and the other half a placebo. Of the 28 children given the treatment, 23 (80%) were able to include peanut in their diet at the conclusion of the 18 month course of therapy.

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FARE Logo

After learning the results of tests performed by SnackSafely.com and the subsequent admission by ContentChecked that their app ignores “may contain” and other cross-contact warnings, Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE) has altered the Corporate Partners page on their website. The advocacy no longer displays language that could be construed as a tacit approval of ContentChecked, replacing it with a general disclaimer that “FARE does not review, test, sponsor, endorse or recommend any products or services that may appear on our website.

SnackSafely.com continues efforts to reach users of ContentChecked who may be relying on the app to determine the allergy content of foods. In tests, ContentChecked declared a series of common food products “free from peanuts” despite clearly visible “may contain peanuts” warnings on their labels. Users relying on the app put themselves and their children at risk of adverse reactions and anaphylaxis.

The company has so far ignored calls by SnackSafely.com to remove their app from the marketplace until its deficiencies are addressed, instead continuing to advertise that “you can feel confident when you are shopping with ContentChecked.”

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Holiday-Update-Banner

It’s that time of year again! The 2014 Holiday Edition of the Safe Snack Guide has arrived just in time for your Hanukkah, Christmas, and New Year’s Celebrations! This edition features a full page dedicated to peanut, tree nut and egg-free holiday-themed goodies to help you celebrate while accommodating those with life-threatening food allergies.

By restricting foods served at your classroom celebrations and holiday parties to products listed in the Guide, you avoid introducing these allergens which can cause contact reactions in children allergic to them. This is a great way of accommodating – not excluding – children with severe allergies to these foods. (We stress that the parents must always be the final arbiters of food given to a child with food allergies!)

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AllergicLiving Logo

Allergic Living’s site features an exclusive interview with Dr Helen Brough, lead author of a British study showing an association between high levels of peanut residue in homes, genetic factors for eczema, and increased incidence of peanut allergy.

The study examined peanut residue by vacuuming the sofas in 577 UK homes with babies in the first year of life. These children were later revisited at 8 and 11 years old and tested for peanut allergy along with a mutation in their genes associated with eczema. The results showed that children with the mutation were 3 times as likely to develop peanut allergy in homes with 3 times the quantity of peanut residue found in the household dust.

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