Currently viewing the tag: "food allergy statistics"

Gourmet NewsMainstream publications serving the food and beverage industry are beginning to turn their attention to the issue of food allergies. We noted a previous article describing our Manufacturer Partnership Program and Safe Snack Guide in Food Navigator-USA last month. This time, Gourmet News, a publication dedicated to the Gourmet industry, is highlighting the issue.

This month’s edition features two front page articles intended to provide coverage and raise awareness within the industry. We’re proud to announce that SnackSafely.com founder, Debra Bloom, features prominently in both.

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Congress

On December 5, federal legislation sponsored by Rep Matt Cartwright (D-PA) was introduced in Congress and assigned to the House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

The Alerting Local Leaders and Ensuring Responsible Guidelines for Youth Act (ALLERGY Act), if enacted, would mandate schools develop programs to address the bullying of children with food allergies. According to a study published in the journal Pediatrics, “31.5% of the children and 24.7% of the parents reported bullying specifically due to FA [food allergy], frequently including threats with foods, primarily by classmates.” The study was based on 251 respondents to a survey of families of children with food allergies.

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PetersonReports of Pro-Bowl Linebacker Adrian Peterson’s 2011 bout of anaphylaxis are making the rounds again. While we applaud Peterson’s advocacy, let’s take the opportunity to recap what we learned.

Peterson, who had no prior history of shellfish allergy, ate a bowl of seafood gumbo for lunch during training camp. About 30 minutes later, he began experiencing classic symptoms of anaphylaxis: itchiness and swelling of the eyes and swelling of his throat resulting in difficulty breathing. He called his trainer who recognized the symptoms and immediately administered epinephrine from an auto-injector he kept on-hand.

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CDCGuidelinesThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has published comprehensive guidelines for the management of food allergies in schools. The document, entitled “Voluntary Guidelines for Managing Food Allergies In Schools and Early Care and Education Programs“, provides practical information and strategies for use in conjunction and compliance with federal laws and regulations.

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Video Game

A trial conducted by the Bradley Hasbro Children’s Research Center and funded by the National Institute of Child Health & Human Development has begun testing the usability and efficacy of a new web-based video game targeted at children with food allergies.

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FARE Walk 2013Maybe your child has a food allergy. Maybe your niece, nephew, grandchild or other close relative is forced to carry an auto-injector. Maybe your son’s best friend can’t come over to your house because it’s too risky, or maybe your daughter can’t bring a peanut butter sandwich to school because you’ve been warned that one of her classmates could become deathly ill. Or maybe you’ve read a recent news headline about yet another child suffering a fatal bout of anaphylaxis.

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NyTimesAn excellent opinion piece by Curtis Sittenfeld entitled “Epipens for All” was published in today’s New York Times Sunday Review. The piece makes the case for support of the School Access to Emergency Epinephrine Act which has been passed by the House and awaits passage by the Senate.

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Fresh Air with Terry GrossAn interview with Dr Kari Nadeu, Director of the Stanford Alliance for Food Allergy Research (SAFAR) at the Stanford University School of Medicine, aired this evening on the NPR radio show “Fresh Air” hosted by Terry Gross. The 14+ minute interview covered a range of topics including the explosion in the incidence of food allergies and epigenetics, the study of gene expression caused by outside factors in the environment.

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Vitamin D and PregnancyA study published in the February issue of the Journal Allergy concludes that high levels of vitamin D in the blood of expectant mothers correlated with increased incidence of food allergy in their children.

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Diets for food-allergic children that are restricted to avoid allergens may impair their growth, researchers reported Monday at the annual conference of the American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology.

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