Faulty Genes May Prove the Root Cause of Allergies

Research shows that defective genes known to play a role in connective tissue disorders also plays a significant role in the development of allergies and points to a possible treatment.

Update on Allergen Immunotherapy

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology have issued a consensus report on the current state of allergen immunotherapy.
Vitamin D and Pregnancy

Study: High Levels of Vitamin D During Pregnancy Linked to Food Allergy in Offspring

A study concludes that high levels of vitamin D in the blood of expectant mothers correlated with increased incidence of food allergy in their children.

Study: Food Allergy Diets Impair Growth in Children

Diets for food-allergic children that are restricted to avoid allergens may impair their growth.
AAAAI

Study: Allergy Risk Increases with Longer U.S. Stay

A study presented at the AAAAI annual meeting found that foreign-born children who did not have allergies before moving to the US were more likely to develop them after 10 years of residence.
Flu Shot

Study: Flu Vaccine Safe for Children with Egg Allergy

A University of Michigan study finds children with severe egg allergy can safely receive a single dose of the seasonal influenza vaccine.

Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Peanut Allergy

A new randomized, placebo-controlled study suggests that a form of immunotherapy may reduce the allergic response to peanuts in adolescents and adults.

Study: Chemical in Tap-Water May Be Linked to Food Allergy

A study by the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) indicates that dichlorophenols may play a role in the development of food allergies.

Study: Peanut Allergies in Children Possibly Linked to Affluence

A recent study asserts that higher incidence of peanut allergy may be associated with more affluent socioeconomic status.
University of Helsinki

Study: People Raised in Rural Environments Less Likely to Develop Allergies

A study conducted at the University of Helsinki confirms that people who grow up in rural environments are less likely to develop autoimmune and inflammatory diseases including allergies.

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